Zaatari 04.06.2016  A higher vantage on daily life as seen from the top of a water tower — the highest point in Zaatari— an otherwise flat, barren landscape covering three square miles in the Jordanian desert.   First opened in July 2012 the camp was initially designed to host a maximum of 60,000 inhabitants and began as a collection of tents in the desert; four years later it is now the 4th largest "city" in Jordan. The camp has grown into a settlement caravans and has earned the badge of being the world’s largest concentration of Syrian refugees — over half of which are children. In many ways the Zaatari camp has become a small, bustling, makeshift city with hospitals, schools, markets and Syrian men, women and children working each day to create something that resembles the life that they once had outside of the camp.  Located just 13 km from the Syrian border, the camp is but a short drive from what is both a conflict zone and their (former) home.
       
     
 04.08.2016 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp  Since the eruption of the brutal conflict in Syria in March of 2011, millions of Syrians have fled their homes in search of peace, safety, and some sense of normalcy.  While tens of thousands have and continue to seek refuge in neighboring countries, the Zaatari refugee camp has quickly become a semi-permanent home for nearly 100,000 individuals, the majority of who once lived in the Da’ara Governorate in Syria’s southwest.  Located 10 km east of the city of Mafraq and first opened on July 28, 2012, the camp is a three-square-mile piece of land in the desolate Jordanian desert; it was initially designed to host a maximum of 60,000 inhabitants and is jointly administered by the Jordanian government and the UNHCR (United Nations High Commission for Refugees). The camp, which has fluctuated in population to as high as 250,000, is now the 4th largest ‘city’ in the Hashemite kingdom of Jordan.
       
     
 04.05.2016 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp  Al Samara, age 15, of Al-Sawra, Syria. Al Samara, his sister, three brothers, mother and father fled Syria nearly 4 years ago and have been living in Zaatari ever since.
       
     
 04.04.2016 The wall that surrounds the Zaatari camp  Those who call Zaatari home represent a fraction of the total number of Syrians who have fled their country, a figure that currently stands at more than 2.5 million.  The statistics are staggering and the sheer scale of the humanitarian crisis is difficult, if not impossible, to grasp.   Zaatari is not unique in that it is but one of hundreds of displacement camps around the world — a that only begins to characterize the harsh reality of the indiscriminate nature of war, and its effects on innocent civilians.
       
     
 Zeinab, age 4, originally of Damascus, Syria Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.05.2016
       
     
 Samara, age 11, originally of Homs, Syria Inside the Zaatari Refugee camp. 04.05.2016  War in Syria has and continues to cause death, destruction and displacement on a horrific scale. Families have been forced from their homes and livelihoods have been destroyed due to violence and the disruption of basic services.  Children are particularly vulnerable to child rights violations such as recruitment into armed groups, exploitation and abuse, including forced early marriage and child labor. Access to education, health care, water, sanitation and social services remains inadequate — even when inside established camps such as Zaatari.  For many humanitarian organizations, the impact of the crisis on a generation of children is a primary and growing concern. While most will survive the conflict physically, the immediate and long-term well-being of children remains as uncertain as the future for this entire generation of kids.
       
     
 Children return to their caravans following school lessons Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016  According to the latest reports provide by the UNHCR 55% of the inhabitants of the Zaatari camp are under the age of 18, making the provision of basic education challenging, at best. There are currently several schools operating in the camp, all on a double shift basis, with girls studying in the mornings and boys in the afternoons, regular attendance is markedly low.  Of those in Zaatari, only about 15,000 of an estimated 28,000 school age children are currently enrolled while an estimated 13% of children in Zaatari are engaged in child labor. Of the larger Syrian refugee population of children, it is estimated that, for a myriad of reasons, over 3 million are not attending school.  The United Nations children’s agency asserts that the war has reversed 10 years of progress in education for Syrian children.
       
     
 Zaatari. 4.11.2016 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp  Rehabilitation through sport has been an ongoing effort since the Zaatari camp first opened in July of 2012.  The majority of Syrians arrive to Zaatari having experienced some degree of trauma; sport provides an outlet and an opportunity to form new friendships in what is an otherwise chaotic, challenging and uncertain environment.
       
     
 Noor prepares a meal as her children play.  Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.21.2016
       
     
 A wedding gown shop displays rental dresses for those who are married while living in the camp.  Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.17.2016
       
     
 Haya, age 5 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Syrians use buckets to collect water at a water distribution tank. Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.12.2016  Located in the middle of the Jordanian desert, in a country whose greatest environmental concern is water scarcity, providing water to those living in the Zaatari camp has been an enormous, ongoing struggle.  When Zaatari first opened in July 2012 all water was trucked into the camp — well over 1 million liters carried in 80 tanker trucks each day. Today, water in Zaatari comes from 450m deep borewells dug, purified and delivered by UNICEF and partners. With new cash-for-work programs operating in the camp, much of the water is distributed by refugee volunteers. This distribution network, initiated in April 2015, is intended to drastically reduce operational costs, ensure equitable distribution of water to all families and help protect the environment.
       
     
 Daily life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016  Since opening in July 2012 Zaatari has established and seen flourish an informal and largely underground economy. The camp features a main road entitled Champs-Elysees (a play on the Parisian shopping destination, this market is the thriving core of what is now Jordan’s fourth-largest population center) where one can have their hair cut, shop in a produce market, rent a wedding gown and buy ice cream.
       
     
 Amal, age 11, originally of Daraa, Syria Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016
       
     
 04.16.2016 Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
       
     
 04.11.2016 Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.18.2016  With many of those in the camp calling Zaatari home for months, if not years, a largely underground, informal economy has sprung up. Many Syrians have opened shops reminiscent of their trade or industry back home or embarked on an entirely new, entrepreneurial path.  It is estimated that there are over 3,000 refugee-operated shops and businesses within the perimeters of the Zaatari camp.
       
     
 04.14.2016 Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
       
     
 04.05.2016 Daily life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
       
     
 Fatmah, age 6, is one of thousands of children who currently call the Zaatari Refugee Camp home. According to a UNHCR report the population of Zaatari hovers right around 80,000 with over half of that number being children and 20% under the age of 5. Fatmah came to the camp with her family in late 2013 -- she enjoys bike rides and playing with some of the other children in the camp.
       
     
 Maya, age 7, from Daraa, Syria stands outside of her “home”—a metal caravan where she lives with her mother and siblings.  Maya arrived to the Zaatari refugee camp in 2012 after she, her mother and siblings fled bombings in Syria. When she first arrived at Zaatari Maya was able to attend a makeshift school that had been set up in the camp — she and her sister attended for three hours in the morning and her brothers attended for three hours in the afternoon.   Since then, things have changed. Maya and her siblings are no longer in school. Her brothers work odd jobs in the camp and Maya and her sister stay home to help their mother.  In the Zaatari camp boys are dropping out of school to earn money for their families while young girls are having their educations cut short as they are married off at younger and younger ages — often in an effort to reduce the number of mouths a family must feed. Begging Syrian children – both during school hours and late into the night – are now common sights on streets throughout the region.
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.14.2016
       
     
 Younis, age 4 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016
       
     
 Daily Life Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     
 The Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS) provided several weeks of care to those living in the camp, operating one of several makeshift medical centers within the Zaatari Refugee Camp.  Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Syrians crouch at the fenceline that separates the Zaatari camp from the rest of Jordan; they are attempting to locate cell phone service.   Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.17.2016
       
     
 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016  Many Syrians who come to the Zaatari Camp ultimately spend months if not years calling the 3 square mile piece of land “home,” For many, expressing themselves using art is a way to cope, process and pass the days. One example of this can be seen on many of the shed-like structures that have been fashioned into shelters — the sides are adorned with myriad painted murals
       
     
 Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016
       
     
 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     
 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016
       
     
 Younis Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.09.2016
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.08.2016
       
     
 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     
 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Daily Life Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Omar Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.08.2016
       
     
 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016
       
     
 Daily Life Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.12.2016
       
     
 Noor Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.06.2016
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     
 Inside the SAMS Medical Clinic within the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.21.2016
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.06.2016
       
     
 Barren land doubles as a soccer pitch. Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     
 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     
 Displaced.  Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 4.18.2016
       
     
 A home shared by two families (13 people) in the Mafraq tent camp. This family’s tent sits within sight of the Zaatari refugee camp, the perimeter of which is visible in the distance. 4.21.2016  While over 80,000 Syrian refugees are currently living in the Zaatari camp this accounts for only about 13% of the 600,000 + Syrians in Jordan. The great majority are making due in makeshift tent camps or struggling to survive within the towns and cities of the Jordanian kingdom.
       
     
 Ali, age 7. 04.21.2017
       
     
 Amira, Sara, Riham, and Halid peer into the tent where 13 members of two families share the small space. Both families fled Syria in 2013 when shellings and bombs began to fall near their homes. 04.21.2016
       
     
 Khalid and his three daughters, Junah, Lubna and Mina 04.21.2016
       
     
 Halid, father of four, sits in a neighbors home within the Mafraq tent camps 4.21.2016
       
     
 Akam 4.21.2016
       
     
 Children play on the land that surrounds several family "homes" in the Mafraq random tent camps. 4.21.2016
       
     
 Daily Life Mafraq Tent Camps 04.21.2016
       
     
 Bassel, age 11, and Alaa, age 9; the two young boys became fast friends over a shared love of futbol. 04.21.2016
       
     
 Afra, age 9.  Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016
       
     
 Displaced Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     
 Halid walks “home” to his tent after running an errand for his father. When asked about his hopes for the future, Halid responded that he wants only for the fighting to stop so that he can go back to Syria, return to school and see his friends again.
       
     
 Zaatari 04.06.2016  A higher vantage on daily life as seen from the top of a water tower — the highest point in Zaatari— an otherwise flat, barren landscape covering three square miles in the Jordanian desert.   First opened in July 2012 the camp was initially designed to host a maximum of 60,000 inhabitants and began as a collection of tents in the desert; four years later it is now the 4th largest "city" in Jordan. The camp has grown into a settlement caravans and has earned the badge of being the world’s largest concentration of Syrian refugees — over half of which are children. In many ways the Zaatari camp has become a small, bustling, makeshift city with hospitals, schools, markets and Syrian men, women and children working each day to create something that resembles the life that they once had outside of the camp.  Located just 13 km from the Syrian border, the camp is but a short drive from what is both a conflict zone and their (former) home.
       
     

Zaatari
04.06.2016

A higher vantage on daily life as seen from the top of a water tower — the highest point in Zaatari— an otherwise flat, barren landscape covering three square miles in the Jordanian desert.

First opened in July 2012 the camp was initially designed to host a maximum of 60,000 inhabitants and began as a collection of tents in the desert; four years later it is now the 4th largest "city" in Jordan. The camp has grown into a settlement caravans and has earned the badge of being the world’s largest concentration of Syrian refugees — over half of which are children.
In many ways the Zaatari camp has become a small, bustling, makeshift city with hospitals, schools, markets and Syrian men, women and children working each day to create something that resembles the life that they once had outside of the camp.

Located just 13 km from the Syrian border, the camp is but a short drive from what is both a conflict zone and their (former) home.

 04.08.2016 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp  Since the eruption of the brutal conflict in Syria in March of 2011, millions of Syrians have fled their homes in search of peace, safety, and some sense of normalcy.  While tens of thousands have and continue to seek refuge in neighboring countries, the Zaatari refugee camp has quickly become a semi-permanent home for nearly 100,000 individuals, the majority of who once lived in the Da’ara Governorate in Syria’s southwest.  Located 10 km east of the city of Mafraq and first opened on July 28, 2012, the camp is a three-square-mile piece of land in the desolate Jordanian desert; it was initially designed to host a maximum of 60,000 inhabitants and is jointly administered by the Jordanian government and the UNHCR (United Nations High Commission for Refugees). The camp, which has fluctuated in population to as high as 250,000, is now the 4th largest ‘city’ in the Hashemite kingdom of Jordan.
       
     

04.08.2016
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp

Since the eruption of the brutal conflict in Syria in March of 2011, millions of Syrians have fled their homes in search of peace, safety, and some sense of normalcy.

While tens of thousands have and continue to seek refuge in neighboring countries, the Zaatari refugee camp has quickly become a semi-permanent home for nearly 100,000 individuals, the majority of who once lived in the Da’ara Governorate in Syria’s southwest.

Located 10 km east of the city of Mafraq and first opened on July 28, 2012, the camp is a three-square-mile piece of land in the desolate Jordanian desert; it was initially designed to host a maximum of 60,000 inhabitants and is jointly administered by the Jordanian government and the UNHCR (United Nations High Commission for Refugees). The camp, which has fluctuated in population to as high as 250,000, is now the 4th largest ‘city’ in the Hashemite kingdom of Jordan.

 04.05.2016 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp  Al Samara, age 15, of Al-Sawra, Syria. Al Samara, his sister, three brothers, mother and father fled Syria nearly 4 years ago and have been living in Zaatari ever since.
       
     

04.05.2016
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp

Al Samara, age 15, of Al-Sawra, Syria. Al Samara, his sister, three brothers, mother and father fled Syria nearly 4 years ago and have been living in Zaatari ever since.

 04.04.2016 The wall that surrounds the Zaatari camp  Those who call Zaatari home represent a fraction of the total number of Syrians who have fled their country, a figure that currently stands at more than 2.5 million.  The statistics are staggering and the sheer scale of the humanitarian crisis is difficult, if not impossible, to grasp.   Zaatari is not unique in that it is but one of hundreds of displacement camps around the world — a that only begins to characterize the harsh reality of the indiscriminate nature of war, and its effects on innocent civilians.
       
     

04.04.2016
The wall that surrounds the Zaatari camp

Those who call Zaatari home represent a fraction of the total number of Syrians who have fled their country, a figure that currently stands at more than 2.5 million.

The statistics are staggering and the sheer scale of the humanitarian crisis is difficult, if not impossible, to grasp.

Zaatari is not unique in that it is but one of hundreds of displacement camps around the world — a that only begins to characterize the harsh reality of the indiscriminate nature of war, and its effects on innocent civilians.

 Zeinab, age 4, originally of Damascus, Syria Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.05.2016
       
     

Zeinab, age 4, originally of Damascus, Syria
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.05.2016

 Samara, age 11, originally of Homs, Syria Inside the Zaatari Refugee camp. 04.05.2016  War in Syria has and continues to cause death, destruction and displacement on a horrific scale. Families have been forced from their homes and livelihoods have been destroyed due to violence and the disruption of basic services.  Children are particularly vulnerable to child rights violations such as recruitment into armed groups, exploitation and abuse, including forced early marriage and child labor. Access to education, health care, water, sanitation and social services remains inadequate — even when inside established camps such as Zaatari.  For many humanitarian organizations, the impact of the crisis on a generation of children is a primary and growing concern. While most will survive the conflict physically, the immediate and long-term well-being of children remains as uncertain as the future for this entire generation of kids.
       
     

Samara, age 11, originally of Homs, Syria
Inside the Zaatari Refugee camp. 04.05.2016

War in Syria has and continues to cause death, destruction and displacement on a horrific scale. Families have been forced from their homes and livelihoods have been destroyed due to violence and the disruption of basic services.

Children are particularly vulnerable to child rights violations such as recruitment into armed groups, exploitation and abuse, including forced early marriage and child labor. Access to education, health care, water, sanitation and social services remains inadequate — even when inside established camps such as Zaatari.

For many humanitarian organizations, the impact of the crisis on a generation of children is a primary and growing concern. While most will survive the conflict physically, the immediate and long-term well-being of children remains as uncertain as the future for this entire generation of kids.

 Children return to their caravans following school lessons Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016  According to the latest reports provide by the UNHCR 55% of the inhabitants of the Zaatari camp are under the age of 18, making the provision of basic education challenging, at best. There are currently several schools operating in the camp, all on a double shift basis, with girls studying in the mornings and boys in the afternoons, regular attendance is markedly low.  Of those in Zaatari, only about 15,000 of an estimated 28,000 school age children are currently enrolled while an estimated 13% of children in Zaatari are engaged in child labor. Of the larger Syrian refugee population of children, it is estimated that, for a myriad of reasons, over 3 million are not attending school.  The United Nations children’s agency asserts that the war has reversed 10 years of progress in education for Syrian children.
       
     

Children return to their caravans following school lessons
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016

According to the latest reports provide by the UNHCR 55% of the inhabitants of the Zaatari camp are under the age of 18, making the provision of basic education challenging, at best. There are currently several schools operating in the camp, all on a double shift basis, with girls studying in the mornings and boys in the afternoons, regular attendance is markedly low.

Of those in Zaatari, only about 15,000 of an estimated 28,000 school age children are currently enrolled while an estimated 13% of children in Zaatari are engaged in child labor. Of the larger Syrian refugee population of children, it is estimated that, for a myriad of reasons, over 3 million are not attending school.

The United Nations children’s agency asserts that the war has reversed 10 years of progress in education for Syrian children.

 Zaatari. 4.11.2016 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp  Rehabilitation through sport has been an ongoing effort since the Zaatari camp first opened in July of 2012.  The majority of Syrians arrive to Zaatari having experienced some degree of trauma; sport provides an outlet and an opportunity to form new friendships in what is an otherwise chaotic, challenging and uncertain environment.
       
     

Zaatari. 4.11.2016
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp

Rehabilitation through sport has been an ongoing effort since the Zaatari camp first opened in July of 2012.

The majority of Syrians arrive to Zaatari having experienced some degree of trauma; sport provides an outlet and an opportunity to form new friendships in what is an otherwise chaotic, challenging and uncertain environment.

 Noor prepares a meal as her children play.  Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.21.2016
       
     

Noor prepares a meal as her children play.
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.21.2016

 A wedding gown shop displays rental dresses for those who are married while living in the camp.  Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.17.2016
       
     

A wedding gown shop displays rental dresses for those who are married while living in the camp. Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.17.2016

 Haya, age 5 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

Haya, age 5
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016

 Syrians use buckets to collect water at a water distribution tank. Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.12.2016  Located in the middle of the Jordanian desert, in a country whose greatest environmental concern is water scarcity, providing water to those living in the Zaatari camp has been an enormous, ongoing struggle.  When Zaatari first opened in July 2012 all water was trucked into the camp — well over 1 million liters carried in 80 tanker trucks each day. Today, water in Zaatari comes from 450m deep borewells dug, purified and delivered by UNICEF and partners. With new cash-for-work programs operating in the camp, much of the water is distributed by refugee volunteers. This distribution network, initiated in April 2015, is intended to drastically reduce operational costs, ensure equitable distribution of water to all families and help protect the environment.
       
     

Syrians use buckets to collect water at a water distribution tank.
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.12.2016

Located in the middle of the Jordanian desert, in a country whose greatest environmental concern is water scarcity, providing water to those living in the Zaatari camp has been an enormous, ongoing struggle.

When Zaatari first opened in July 2012 all water was trucked into the camp — well over 1 million liters carried in 80 tanker trucks each day. Today, water in Zaatari comes from 450m deep borewells dug, purified and delivered by UNICEF and partners. With new cash-for-work programs operating in the camp, much of the water is distributed by refugee volunteers. This distribution network, initiated in April 2015, is intended to drastically reduce operational costs, ensure equitable distribution of water to all families and help protect the environment.

 Daily life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016  Since opening in July 2012 Zaatari has established and seen flourish an informal and largely underground economy. The camp features a main road entitled Champs-Elysees (a play on the Parisian shopping destination, this market is the thriving core of what is now Jordan’s fourth-largest population center) where one can have their hair cut, shop in a produce market, rent a wedding gown and buy ice cream.
       
     

Daily life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.11.2016

Since opening in July 2012 Zaatari has established and seen flourish an informal and largely underground economy. The camp features a main road entitled Champs-Elysees (a play on the Parisian shopping destination, this market is the thriving core of what is now Jordan’s fourth-largest population center) where one can have their hair cut, shop in a produce market, rent a wedding gown and buy ice cream.

 Amal, age 11, originally of Daraa, Syria Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016
       
     

Amal, age 11, originally of Daraa, Syria
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016

 04.16.2016 Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
       
     

04.16.2016
Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp

 04.11.2016 Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
       
     

04.11.2016
Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.18.2016  With many of those in the camp calling Zaatari home for months, if not years, a largely underground, informal economy has sprung up. Many Syrians have opened shops reminiscent of their trade or industry back home or embarked on an entirely new, entrepreneurial path.  It is estimated that there are over 3,000 refugee-operated shops and businesses within the perimeters of the Zaatari camp.
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.18.2016

With many of those in the camp calling Zaatari home for months, if not years, a largely underground, informal economy has sprung up. Many Syrians have opened shops reminiscent of their trade or industry back home or embarked on an entirely new, entrepreneurial path.

It is estimated that there are over 3,000 refugee-operated shops and businesses within the perimeters of the Zaatari camp.

 04.14.2016 Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
       
     

04.14.2016
Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp

 04.05.2016 Daily life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
       
     

04.05.2016
Daily life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp

 Fatmah, age 6, is one of thousands of children who currently call the Zaatari Refugee Camp home. According to a UNHCR report the population of Zaatari hovers right around 80,000 with over half of that number being children and 20% under the age of 5. Fatmah came to the camp with her family in late 2013 -- she enjoys bike rides and playing with some of the other children in the camp.
       
     

Fatmah, age 6, is one of thousands of children who currently call the Zaatari Refugee Camp home. According to a UNHCR report the population of Zaatari hovers right around 80,000 with over half of that number being children and 20% under the age of 5. Fatmah came to the camp with her family in late 2013 -- she enjoys bike rides and playing with some of the other children in the camp.

 Maya, age 7, from Daraa, Syria stands outside of her “home”—a metal caravan where she lives with her mother and siblings.  Maya arrived to the Zaatari refugee camp in 2012 after she, her mother and siblings fled bombings in Syria. When she first arrived at Zaatari Maya was able to attend a makeshift school that had been set up in the camp — she and her sister attended for three hours in the morning and her brothers attended for three hours in the afternoon.   Since then, things have changed. Maya and her siblings are no longer in school. Her brothers work odd jobs in the camp and Maya and her sister stay home to help their mother.  In the Zaatari camp boys are dropping out of school to earn money for their families while young girls are having their educations cut short as they are married off at younger and younger ages — often in an effort to reduce the number of mouths a family must feed. Begging Syrian children – both during school hours and late into the night – are now common sights on streets throughout the region.
       
     

Maya, age 7, from Daraa, Syria stands outside of her “home”—a metal caravan where she lives with her mother and siblings.

Maya arrived to the Zaatari refugee camp in 2012 after she, her mother and siblings fled bombings in Syria. When she first arrived at Zaatari Maya was able to attend a makeshift school that had been set up in the camp — she and her sister attended for three hours in the morning and her brothers attended for three hours in the afternoon.

Since then, things have changed. Maya and her siblings are no longer in school. Her brothers work odd jobs in the camp and Maya and her sister stay home to help their mother.

In the Zaatari camp boys are dropping out of school to earn money for their families while young girls are having their educations cut short as they are married off at younger and younger ages — often in an effort to reduce the number of mouths a family must feed. Begging Syrian children – both during school hours and late into the night – are now common sights on streets throughout the region.

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.16.2016

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.14.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.14.2016

 Younis, age 4 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016
       
     

Younis, age 4
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016

 Daily Life Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     

Daily Life
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016

 The Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS) provided several weeks of care to those living in the camp, operating one of several makeshift medical centers within the Zaatari Refugee Camp.  Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

The Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS) provided several weeks of care to those living in the camp, operating one of several makeshift medical centers within the Zaatari Refugee Camp.

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016

 Syrians crouch at the fenceline that separates the Zaatari camp from the rest of Jordan; they are attempting to locate cell phone service.   Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.17.2016
       
     

Syrians crouch at the fenceline that separates the Zaatari camp from the rest of Jordan; they are attempting to locate cell phone service.

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.17.2016

 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016  Many Syrians who come to the Zaatari Camp ultimately spend months if not years calling the 3 square mile piece of land “home,” For many, expressing themselves using art is a way to cope, process and pass the days. One example of this can be seen on many of the shed-like structures that have been fashioned into shelters — the sides are adorned with myriad painted murals
       
     

Zaatari Art
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016

Many Syrians who come to the Zaatari Camp ultimately spend months if not years calling the 3 square mile piece of land “home,”
For many, expressing themselves using art is a way to cope, process and pass the days. One example of this can be seen on many of the shed-like structures that have been fashioned into shelters — the sides are adorned with myriad painted murals

 Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016
       
     

Daily Life in the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.11.2016

 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

Zaatari Art
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.15.2016

 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016
       
     

Zaatari Art
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016

 Younis Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.09.2016
       
     

Younis
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.09.2016

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.08.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.08.2016

 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

Zaatari Art
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016

 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     

Zaatari Art
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016

 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

Zaatari Art
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016

 Daily Life Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

Daily Life
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016

 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

Zaatari Art
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016

 Omar Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.08.2016
       
     

Omar
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.08.2016

 Zaatari Art Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016
       
     

Zaatari Art
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.19.2016

 Daily Life Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.12.2016
       
     

Daily Life
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.12.2016

 Noor Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     

Noor
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.06.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.06.2016

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.15.2016

 Inside the SAMS Medical Clinic within the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.11.2016
       
     

Inside the SAMS Medical Clinic within the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.11.2016

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.21.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.21.2016

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.06.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.06.2016

 Barren land doubles as a soccer pitch. Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     

Barren land doubles as a soccer pitch.
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016

 Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.16.2016
       
     

Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp
04.16.2016

 Displaced.  Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 4.18.2016
       
     

Displaced.
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 4.18.2016

 A home shared by two families (13 people) in the Mafraq tent camp. This family’s tent sits within sight of the Zaatari refugee camp, the perimeter of which is visible in the distance. 4.21.2016  While over 80,000 Syrian refugees are currently living in the Zaatari camp this accounts for only about 13% of the 600,000 + Syrians in Jordan. The great majority are making due in makeshift tent camps or struggling to survive within the towns and cities of the Jordanian kingdom.
       
     

A home shared by two families (13 people) in the Mafraq tent camp. This family’s tent sits within sight of the Zaatari refugee camp, the perimeter of which is visible in the distance. 4.21.2016

While over 80,000 Syrian refugees are currently living in the Zaatari camp this accounts for only about 13% of the 600,000 + Syrians in Jordan. The great majority are making due in makeshift tent camps or struggling to survive within the towns and cities of the Jordanian kingdom.

 Ali, age 7. 04.21.2017
       
     

Ali, age 7.
04.21.2017

 Amira, Sara, Riham, and Halid peer into the tent where 13 members of two families share the small space. Both families fled Syria in 2013 when shellings and bombs began to fall near their homes. 04.21.2016
       
     

Amira, Sara, Riham, and Halid peer into the tent where 13 members of two families share the small space. Both families fled Syria in 2013 when shellings and bombs began to fall near their homes.
04.21.2016

 Khalid and his three daughters, Junah, Lubna and Mina 04.21.2016
       
     

Khalid and his three daughters, Junah, Lubna and Mina
04.21.2016

 Halid, father of four, sits in a neighbors home within the Mafraq tent camps 4.21.2016
       
     

Halid, father of four, sits in a neighbors home within the Mafraq tent camps
4.21.2016

 Akam 4.21.2016
       
     

Akam
4.21.2016

 Children play on the land that surrounds several family "homes" in the Mafraq random tent camps. 4.21.2016
       
     

Children play on the land that surrounds several family "homes" in the Mafraq random tent camps. 4.21.2016

 Daily Life Mafraq Tent Camps 04.21.2016
       
     

Daily Life
Mafraq Tent Camps 04.21.2016

 Bassel, age 11, and Alaa, age 9; the two young boys became fast friends over a shared love of futbol. 04.21.2016
       
     

Bassel, age 11, and Alaa, age 9; the two young boys became fast friends over a shared love of futbol. 04.21.2016

 Afra, age 9.  Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016
       
     

Afra, age 9.
Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016

 Displaced Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016
       
     

Displaced
Inside the Zaatari Refugee Camp 04.15.2016

 Halid walks “home” to his tent after running an errand for his father. When asked about his hopes for the future, Halid responded that he wants only for the fighting to stop so that he can go back to Syria, return to school and see his friends again.
       
     

Halid walks “home” to his tent after running an errand for his father. When asked about his hopes for the future, Halid responded that he wants only for the fighting to stop so that he can go back to Syria, return to school and see his friends again.