Since 2000 nearly 15,000 refugees have resettled in Syracuse.   Most families have fled extreme poverty, environmental disasters, political turmoil, conflict or worse and have since began life anew, many arriving in Syracuse without a penny or a word of English. These communities — spanning individuals from throughout Africa, The Middle East, Ukraine, Cuba and parts of Asia.   Since moving to Syracuse in July 2018 I’ve begun to explore these communities and have had the privilege of being allowed into the lives of some of these families as they work to recreate “home” thousands of miles away from the ones they once knew.  What I have come to know of individual stories and journeys to Syracuse combined with my personal experiences abroad stands in sharp contrast to what many understand and believe about this amorphous, yet individually unique group that is often referred to as a single entity — “refugees.”
       
     
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 Since 2000 nearly 15,000 refugees have resettled in Syracuse.   Most families have fled extreme poverty, environmental disasters, political turmoil, conflict or worse and have since began life anew, many arriving in Syracuse without a penny or a word of English. These communities — spanning individuals from throughout Africa, The Middle East, Ukraine, Cuba and parts of Asia.   Since moving to Syracuse in July 2018 I’ve begun to explore these communities and have had the privilege of being allowed into the lives of some of these families as they work to recreate “home” thousands of miles away from the ones they once knew.  What I have come to know of individual stories and journeys to Syracuse combined with my personal experiences abroad stands in sharp contrast to what many understand and believe about this amorphous, yet individually unique group that is often referred to as a single entity — “refugees.”
       
     

Since 2000 nearly 15,000 refugees have resettled in Syracuse.

Most families have fled extreme poverty, environmental disasters, political turmoil, conflict or worse and have since began life anew, many arriving in Syracuse without a penny or a word of English. These communities — spanning individuals from throughout Africa, The Middle East, Ukraine, Cuba and parts of Asia.

Since moving to Syracuse in July 2018 I’ve begun to explore these communities and have had the privilege of being allowed into the lives of some of these families as they work to recreate “home” thousands of miles away from the ones they once knew.

What I have come to know of individual stories and journeys to Syracuse combined with my personal experiences abroad stands in sharp contrast to what many understand and believe about this amorphous, yet individually unique group that is often referred to as a single entity — “refugees.”


community-2.jpg
       
     
community-3.jpg
       
     
community-4.jpg
       
     
community-5.jpg
       
     
community-6.jpg
       
     
community-7.jpg
       
     
_98A6252.jpg
       
     
community-8.jpg
       
     
community-9.jpg
       
     
community-10.jpg
       
     
community-11.jpg
       
     
community-12.jpg
       
     
community-13.jpg
       
     
community-14.jpg
       
     
community-15.jpg
       
     
community-16.jpg
       
     
community-17.jpg
       
     
community-18.jpg
       
     
community-19.jpg
       
     
community-20.jpg
       
     
community-21.jpg
       
     
community-22.jpg
       
     
community-23.jpg
       
     
community-24.jpg
       
     
community-25.jpg