A home shared by two families (13 people) in the Mafraq tent camp. This family’s tent sits within sight of the Zaatari refugee camp, the perimeter of which is visible in the distance. 4.21.2016   While over 80,000 Syrian refugees are currently living in the Zaatari camp this accounts for only about 13% of the 600,000 + Syrians in Jordan. The great majority are making due in random, makeshift tent camps or struggling to survive within the towns and cities of the Jordanian kingdom.  While in Jordan, i had the opportunity to travel to the area of Mafraq and was introduced to several Syrian families who have, for years, been living in tents set up on small patches of barren land. These tents are home to anywhere from a few individuals to many generations of one family to numerous families living together..   Syrian refugees have no rights in Jordan. As a result, they are not legally permitted to work, have little to no access to healthcare and get by on coupons provided by the Jordanian government. These coupons are good for basic needs, but anything outside of those needs requires cash. Unable to work legally the only way to obtain cash is to work illegally or to sell the items that they are able to obtain through the government coupons.   While the individual stories differ the situation is shockingly similar for all. Each person that I met has left behind a life where they were a doctor, an engineer, a teacher, a student, a husband, wife or a young child when the fighting and shelling became too much and the decision was made to flee. Each of them has left everything behind: homes, cars, friends, clothing, memories … life as they have known it for most of their existence.  
       
     
 Amira, Sara, Riham, and Halid peer into the tent where 13 members of two families share the small space. Both families fled Syria in 2013 when shellings and bombs began to fall near their homes. 04.21.2016
       
     
 Halid, father of four, sits in a neighbors home within the Mafraq tent camps 4.21.2016
       
     
 The makeshift kitchen and washroom inside of a tent shared by 13 members of two families; there is no running water and electricity is only available when it can be diverted from nearby power sources. 04.21.2016
       
     
 An area within a family tent that is utilized as a place for bathing, washing dishes and as a toilet.  4.21.2016
       
     
 Hawre, age 8.  04.21.2016
       
     
 Akam 4.21.2016
       
     
 Daily Life Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016
       
     
 Khalid and his three daughters, Junah, Lubna and Mina 04.21.2016
       
     
 Ali, age 7. 04.21.2017
       
     
 Daily Life Mafraq Tent Camps 04.21.2016
       
     
 Bassel, age 11, and Alaa, age 9; the two young boys became fast friends over a shared love of futbol 04.21.2016
       
     
 Afra, age 9.  Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016
       
     
 Children play on the land that surrounds several family "homes" in the Mafraq random tent camps 4.21.2016
       
     
 The sun sets on another day in the Mafraq tent camps 04.21.2016
       
     
 Halid walks “home” to his tent after running an errand for his father. When asked about his hopes for the future, Halid responded that he  wants only for the fighting to stop so that he can go back to Syria, return to school and see his friends again.  
       
     
 A home shared by two families (13 people) in the Mafraq tent camp. This family’s tent sits within sight of the Zaatari refugee camp, the perimeter of which is visible in the distance. 4.21.2016   While over 80,000 Syrian refugees are currently living in the Zaatari camp this accounts for only about 13% of the 600,000 + Syrians in Jordan. The great majority are making due in random, makeshift tent camps or struggling to survive within the towns and cities of the Jordanian kingdom.  While in Jordan, i had the opportunity to travel to the area of Mafraq and was introduced to several Syrian families who have, for years, been living in tents set up on small patches of barren land. These tents are home to anywhere from a few individuals to many generations of one family to numerous families living together..   Syrian refugees have no rights in Jordan. As a result, they are not legally permitted to work, have little to no access to healthcare and get by on coupons provided by the Jordanian government. These coupons are good for basic needs, but anything outside of those needs requires cash. Unable to work legally the only way to obtain cash is to work illegally or to sell the items that they are able to obtain through the government coupons.   While the individual stories differ the situation is shockingly similar for all. Each person that I met has left behind a life where they were a doctor, an engineer, a teacher, a student, a husband, wife or a young child when the fighting and shelling became too much and the decision was made to flee. Each of them has left everything behind: homes, cars, friends, clothing, memories … life as they have known it for most of their existence.  
       
     

A home shared by two families (13 people) in the Mafraq tent camp. This family’s tent sits within sight of the Zaatari refugee camp, the perimeter of which is visible in the distance.
4.21.2016 

While over 80,000 Syrian refugees are currently living in the Zaatari camp this accounts for only about 13% of the 600,000 + Syrians in Jordan. The great majority are making due in random, makeshift tent camps or struggling to survive within the towns and cities of the Jordanian kingdom.

While in Jordan, i had the opportunity to travel to the area of Mafraq and was introduced to several Syrian families who have, for years, been living in tents set up on small patches of barren land. These tents are home to anywhere from a few individuals to many generations of one family to numerous families living together.. 

Syrian refugees have no rights in Jordan. As a result, they are not legally permitted to work, have little to no access to healthcare and get by on coupons provided by the Jordanian government. These coupons are good for basic needs, but anything outside of those needs requires cash. Unable to work legally the only way to obtain cash is to work illegally or to sell the items that they are able to obtain through the government coupons. 

While the individual stories differ the situation is shockingly similar for all. Each person that I met has left behind a life where they were a doctor, an engineer, a teacher, a student, a husband, wife or a young child when the fighting and shelling became too much and the decision was made to flee. Each of them has left everything behind: homes, cars, friends, clothing, memories … life as they have known it for most of their existence.
 

 Amira, Sara, Riham, and Halid peer into the tent where 13 members of two families share the small space. Both families fled Syria in 2013 when shellings and bombs began to fall near their homes. 04.21.2016
       
     

Amira, Sara, Riham, and Halid peer into the tent where 13 members of two families share the small space. Both families fled Syria in 2013 when shellings and bombs began to fall near their homes.
04.21.2016

 Halid, father of four, sits in a neighbors home within the Mafraq tent camps 4.21.2016
       
     

Halid, father of four, sits in a neighbors home within the Mafraq tent camps
4.21.2016

 The makeshift kitchen and washroom inside of a tent shared by 13 members of two families; there is no running water and electricity is only available when it can be diverted from nearby power sources. 04.21.2016
       
     

The makeshift kitchen and washroom inside of a tent shared by 13 members of two families; there is no running water and electricity is only available when it can be diverted from nearby power sources.
04.21.2016

 An area within a family tent that is utilized as a place for bathing, washing dishes and as a toilet.  4.21.2016
       
     

An area within a family tent that is utilized as a place for bathing, washing dishes and as a toilet. 
4.21.2016

 Hawre, age 8.  04.21.2016
       
     

Hawre, age 8. 
04.21.2016

 Akam 4.21.2016
       
     

Akam
4.21.2016

 Daily Life Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016
       
     

Daily Life
Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016

 Khalid and his three daughters, Junah, Lubna and Mina 04.21.2016
       
     

Khalid and his three daughters, Junah, Lubna and Mina
04.21.2016

 Ali, age 7. 04.21.2017
       
     

Ali, age 7.
04.21.2017

 Daily Life Mafraq Tent Camps 04.21.2016
       
     

Daily Life
Mafraq Tent Camps 04.21.2016

 Bassel, age 11, and Alaa, age 9; the two young boys became fast friends over a shared love of futbol 04.21.2016
       
     

Bassel, age 11, and Alaa, age 9; the two young boys became fast friends over a shared love of futbol
04.21.2016

 Afra, age 9.  Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016
       
     

Afra, age 9. 
Mafraq Tent Camp 04.21.2016

 Children play on the land that surrounds several family "homes" in the Mafraq random tent camps 4.21.2016
       
     

Children play on the land that surrounds several family "homes" in the Mafraq random tent camps
4.21.2016

 The sun sets on another day in the Mafraq tent camps 04.21.2016
       
     

The sun sets on another day in the Mafraq tent camps
04.21.2016

 Halid walks “home” to his tent after running an errand for his father. When asked about his hopes for the future, Halid responded that he  wants only for the fighting to stop so that he can go back to Syria, return to school and see his friends again.  
       
     

Halid walks “home” to his tent after running an errand for his father. When asked about his hopes for the future, Halid responded that he  wants only for the fighting to stop so that he can go back to Syria, return to school and see his friends again.